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Bridging
the Gap:

Ending Student Hunger
with Breakfast After the Bell

2018 NEW YORK STATE SCHOOL BREAKFAST REPORT

Chart #1: School Breakfast Program Participation in New York State Public Schools

This table gives a local-level overview of school breakfast participation in school districts and charter schools, comparing the 2015-2016 school year to the 2016-2017 school year.

This analysis provides an overview of students eligible for free and reduced-price (F/RP) school breakfast within each district/charter school. In addition, it provides an overview of participation among F/RP-eligible students and among the overall student body.

Furthermore, the table reveals whether or not a school district/charter school utilized a federal provision to provide free breakfast to all students during the 2016-2017 school year. It also indicates the number of individual schools within the school district that utilized a federal provision, specifically the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) or Provision 2, to provide breakfast at no cost to all students. An asterisk next to the provision indicates that the district does not offer provide free breakfast in all schools.

Chart #2: The School Breakfast Gap: Free and Reduced-Price School Breakfast Participation in Comparison to School Lunch Participation During the 2016-2017 School Year

This table is a district-level analysis of the School Breakfast Gap – which refers to the disparity between breakfast and lunch participation among low-income students. This analysis compares of the number of students eating free and reduced-price (F/RP) school breakfast in comparison to the number of students eating F/RP school lunch for each district/charter school.

Participation in the National School Lunch Program tells us the number of students who could and should be benefiting from the School Breakfast Program. The nationally recognized benchmark for strong school breakfast participation is reaching 70% free and reduced-price lunch participants with school breakfast. You can find each the percentage of free and reduced-price lunch participants who also ate school breakfast for each school district/charter schools in the column titled “SBP vs. NSLP F/RP Participation” in the chart.

Furthermore, the table shows whether or not a school district/charter school utilized a federal provision to provide free breakfast to all students during the 2016-2017 school year. It also indicates the number of individual schools within the school district that utilized either a federal provision, specifically the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) or Provision 2.

Chart #3: Additional Federal Funding if School Districts Reached 70% of Free and Reduced-Price (F/RP) Lunch Participants with F/RP Breakfast

This table is a district-level analysis of the School Breakfast Gap – which refers to the disparity between breakfast and lunch participation among low-income students. This analysis demonstrates the additional low-income students that could eat school breakfast and the potential revenue that could be generated if each district/charter school reached the benchmark of 70% of F/RP lunch participants participating in breakfast.

You can find the number of additional low-income students that would benefit from school breakfast as a result of increased breakfast participation in the column titled, “# of Additional Students Eating F/RP Breakfast to Reach 70% of NSLP”. This analysis also demonstrates the maximum potential revenue that could be generated by each school district with increased breakfast participation, based on the total number of school days (180 days). The second analysis (165 days) represents the national average number of days states served school breakfast.

Statewide, only 48% of students eating free or reduced price (F/RP) lunch through the National School Lunch Program also eat F/RP breakfast at school through the School Breakfast Program. If New York State achieved a goal of reaching 70% of these low-income students, the state could receive $64.9 million in additional federal reimbursement. Further, if NYS were able to get 70% of its low-income students to eat both breakfast and lunch, an additional 227,024 students would eat F/RP breakfast each day.

Technical Notes:

The data used in the above tables is provided by the New York State Education Department’s Child Nutrition Program Administration. Using this data, Hunger Solutions New York tracks participation and conducts each analysis outlined above to examine participation in the School Breakfast Program.

This analysis only captures public schools that operated the federal School Breakfast Program during the school years specified above. Private schools are not included. Schools that offer breakfast and lunch outside of that program, using their school’s general fund, are not included. The findings also do not include public schools that operate only the National School Lunch Program. Also, in certain cases, school districts may not have offered the School Breakfast Program in all of their buildings, therefore, while the district may be represented in this data set, only the individual buildings that offered school breakfast are included in the data.

If you have questions about any of these charts, please email Jessica Pino-Goodspeed.