SNAP

SNAP

SNAP
The president’s FY 2018 budget proposes $193 billion in cuts to SNAP over the next 10 years. These cuts, which would slash SNAP by an unprecedented 25 percent, will dismantle a proven and effective program that provides a path out of hunger and poverty for millions of New Yorkers.
SNAP
The Fiscal Policy Institute and Hunger Solutions New York have teamed up to issue a joint press release highlighting a report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities that quantifies the impact of the Trump Administration's proposed SNAP cuts to New York. Over 10 years, New York would be expected to absorb $8.5 billion in SNAP costs or restrict the program to meet the
SNAP
President Trump’s 2018 budget proposes to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) by more than $193 billion over the next ten years — a more than 25 percent cut — through a massive cost shift to states, cutting eligibility for millions of households and reducing benefits for hundreds of thousands more, as highlighted in a new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The unemployed, the elderly, and low-income working families with children would bear the brunt of the cuts.
SNAP
Victims of a severe windstorm and subsequent snowstorms in the Rochester area who lost power and had food spoilage during the outage now have until March 31 to apply for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) replacement benefits.
SNAP
On January 1, 2016, NYS reinstated a rule that restricts unemployed, childless adults to three months of SNAP benefits in a 36-month period ending December 31, 2018, unless they meet strict work rules, are exempt, or live in waived area. This policy update explains the process by which a person determined to be an ABAWD and who has lost their SNAP benefits, due to not complying with the time limit work rules, can re-establish their eligibility for SNAP.
SNAP
On January 1, 2017, the Social Security Administration adjusted the following types of social security income including: federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI), regular Social Security (SS) income, and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) to reflect a 0.3% increase in the cost of living (COLA).
SNAP
Each Oct.1, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) adjusts the income guidelines used to determine eligibility and the standards and deductions used to determine the monthly benefits an eligible family will receive.This toolkit provides tools and resources to help community organizations when working with SNAP applicants. It includes: a SNAP policy update, the 2016 SNAP Budget Worksheet, 2016 NYSNIP Matrix and updated SNAP Benefit Estimators.
SNAP
This policy update highlights information provided by the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA) through 16-ADM-08. This directive is to advise SNAP offices of requirements resulting from a settlement of litigation, known as Rafferty, concerning individuals who are blind or seriously visually impaired.
SNAP
This policy update from Hunger Solutions New York highlights information provided by the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA) through GIS 16 TA/DC048. This GIS provides clarification to SNAP offices on the eligibility of Cuban-Haitian entrants under an order of supervision.
SNAP
The roll out of the new card design began this month in NYC and will continue in September for upstate counties. There will be no mass replacement of current EBT cards. Only new applicants and those needing a replacement card (due to damage or loss of current card) will receive a card with the new design.

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