SNAP

SNAP

SNAP
In our newest SNAP Policy Update we highlight information from OTDA concerning a clarification received from United States Department of Agriculture/Food and Nutrition Services (USDA/FNS) around eligibility for expedited SNAP benefits for recipients determined to be an ABAWD and who were previously deemed ineligible for SNAP for noncompliance with the time limit work rules.
SNAP
SNAP (formerly food stamps), the nation’s most critical anti-hunger program, also encourages work, a new report and video by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explain. SNAP’s benefit structure rewards earnings over unearned income (such as Social Security or cash assistance), which incentivizes participants to work and seek higher wages or work more hours.
SNAP
The House Budget Committee’s fiscal year 2018 budget resolution released last week would make hunger in this country far worse. The proposal combines a huge tax cut that is heavily tilted toward the rich with tens of billions of dollars in safety net program cuts. Read our latest update on the federal budget, including analyses, talking points, sample social media posts and a call to action to contact Members of Congress.
SNAP
New York City, where 1.7 million people receive SNAP, now allows eligibility documents to be submitted via smartphones.
SNAP
This newest SNAP policy update from Hunger Solutions New York highlights the policies and procedures for the NYS ABAWD Time Limit Rule that began in many counties on January 1, 2016.
SNAP
This new article, in Modern Farmer, looks at who will be hurt by the proposed cuts to SNAP in the Presidents FY 2018 Budget Proposal. The 42 million Americans—13 percent of the population—who currently receive SNAP benefits, which include low income families, the elderly, people with disabilities, and those who have lost a job are the most obvious. They receive an average of about $4.17 per day, or $1.39 per meal. SNAP plays a role in the broader economy, providing an expanded customer base to grocers and farmers, for example. It’s also a safety net that keeps people off the streets, out of hospitals, and away from illicit activity. When money for food is a constant concern for millions of people, taxpayers ultimately foot the bill for the associated increase in healthcare costs, homeless shelters, and incarceration. Here’s who’s going to feel the hurt.
SNAP
Due to recent flooding and power outages in areas of NYS we want to alert SNAP (food stamp) recipients about replacement SNAP benefits. Current SNAP recipients who lost food purchased with their SNAP/EBT card due to flooding or a power outage of more than 4 hours may be eligible for replacement SNAP benefits.
SNAP
The president’s FY 2018 budget proposes $193 billion in cuts to SNAP over the next 10 years. These cuts, which would slash SNAP by an unprecedented 25 percent, will dismantle a proven and effective program that provides a path out of hunger and poverty for millions of New Yorkers.
SNAP
The Fiscal Policy Institute and Hunger Solutions New York have teamed up to issue a joint press release highlighting a report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities that quantifies the impact of the Trump Administration's proposed SNAP cuts to New York. Over 10 years, New York would be expected to absorb $8.5 billion in SNAP costs or restrict the program to meet the
SNAP
President Trump’s 2018 budget proposes to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) by more than $193 billion over the next ten years — a more than 25 percent cut — through a massive cost shift to states, cutting eligibility for millions of households and reducing benefits for hundreds of thousands more, as highlighted in a new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The unemployed, the elderly, and low-income working families with children would bear the brunt of the cuts.

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