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SNAP

SNAP

SNAP
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) is the nation’s most important anti-hunger program, reaching 44 million people nationwide in 2016 alone. This fact sheet by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities(CBPP) provide NYS data on who participates in the SNAP program, the benefits they receive, and SNAP’s role in strengthening the economy.
SNAP
On Jan. 1, 2016, NYS reinstated a rule that restricts unemployed, childless adults to three months of SNAP benefits through December 2018, unless they meet strict work rules, are exempt, or live in waived area. In federal regulations, the rule is referred to as Able Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWD).
SNAP
A recent research brief by the Food Bank For NYC highlights the continued increase need at food pantries and soup kitchens in New York City three years after the SNAP program was cut throughout the nation.
SNAP
Hunger Solutions New York utilizes an innovative web-based tool called mRelief to help Long Island residents quickly determine if they may be eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). MRelief was recently featured in a Chicago Tribune article, which reported that in 2016, the tool connected 100,000 families nationwide to social services.
SNAP
Nutrition Outreach and Education Program (NOEP) Coordinators work one-on-one with hungry New Yorkers. They hear firsthand how the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and other federally funded nutrition assistance programs can serve as a lifeline. Louise Novak, NOEP Coordinator for Schenectady County, recently worked with a man who had been homeless for six years
SNAP
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced the seven retail firms selected to take part in a pilot designed to enable Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants to purchase their groceries online. The two-year pilot is slated to begin this summer.
SNAP
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack recently released a statement on the House Committee on Agriculture's new report on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which contains the Committee's findings from a series of hearings on SNAP.
SNAP
Once winter comes, work slows down or stops all together for many New Yorkers. Construction workers, farm workers and others with seasonal jobs often struggle to make ends meet when the weather turns cold. People who have trouble affording enough food during slow work times may be eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps. SNAP helps more than 462,000 working families in New York buy groceries.
SNAP
Children’s HealthWatch's new Report Card on Food Security Among Young Children focuses on the millions of children in families experiencing hidden food stress, technically referred to as marginal food security, who face health and development risks.
SNAP
Winter made an early appearance in New York State. The cold weather forces many people to choose between keeping their home at a safe temperature and buying the food they need to stay healthy. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) can make it possible to do both. Our Nutrition Outreach and Education Program (NOEP) Coordinators are available statewide to help eligible people apply for SNAP, and can also give referrals for HEAP.

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