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SNAP

SNAP
The Anti-Hunger Champion Award honors New York State leaders who have taken strategic and decisive steps to reduce hunger in our state and beyond. We are pleased to present the 2017 award to Senator Kirsten Gillibrand in recognition of her tireless efforts to protect and defend the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), strengthen core child nutrition programs, and to ensure every New Yorker has access to enough healthy food.
SNAP
For millions of Americans, work doesn’t provide enough income for them to feed their families. A new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explains that SNAP (formerly food stamps) provides workers with low pay and often fluctuating incomes with crucial additional monthly income to help put food on the table. It also helps workers get by while they’re between jobs.
SNAP
In 2016, Hunger Solutions New York concluded its fifth year of partnering with the Health and Welfare Council of Long Island on the Long Island Anti-Hunger Initiative (LIAH), which utilized traditional and technology-based Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) outreach strategies to assist low-income residents of Nassau and Suffolk counties.
SNAP
Fresh fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet but they’re not always easy to come by. Many low-income New Yorkers lack access to a supermarket that stocks a variety of produce and must rely on what they can purchase at convenience stores. Farmers’ markets help to fill that gap. Many are located in areas where there is no nearby supermarket.
SNAP
This summer, Hunger Solutions New York will solicit proposals for the Nutrition Outreach and Education Program (NOEP). Community-based nonprofit organizations will have the opportunity to apply for a contract to provide free, confidential Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) information, education, prescreening and application services to low-income New Yorkers.
SNAP
Hunger Solutions New York’s annual SNAP Prescreening Guide has been updated and is available in digital form.
SNAP
Despite SNAP’s modest benefits - only about $1.40 on average per person per meal - it’s a critical foundation for millions of low-income families, senior citizens, and people with disabilities who use its benefits to put food on the table each month. There are a number of problems with converting SNAP to a block grant, or with other changes that would cap SNAP’s funding or merge it with other programs, as some House Republican leaders have proposed. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities detail these problems in a new blog, paper and a video.
SNAP
The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities is highlighting SNAP's powerful reach for many demographic groups including children, seniors, Latino's and African American's. These fact sheets include insightful charts, state specific information, and selected characteristics around participation in SNAP.
SNAP
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has posted 2 recent blogs highlighting research showing how important SNAP (food stamps) and WIC are for children, many of whom face the dual risks of poverty and food insecurity. One in five children live in poverty; one in six live in families that have trouble putting enough food on the table.
SNAP
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) responds to changes in the economy, growing to help those in need during recessions and then shrinking when the economy improves. Two new interactive graphics from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities illustrate how SNAP has responded to the economy, as designed, in recent years.

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